July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation gains momentum: how the Circular Action Alliance is shaping packaging waste management

July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

1 Information provided by NAPCOR from the studies Cradle-to-resin life cycle analysis of polyethylene terephthalate resin (March 2020) and Life cycle impacts for post-consumer recycled resins: PET, HDPE, and PP (December 2018). All data sources may be found on this link.

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation gains momentum: how the Circular Action Alliance is shaping packaging waste management

July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

1 To learn more about Instituto de Embalagens, visit their website.
July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation gains momentum: how the Circular Action Alliance is shaping packaging waste management

July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation gains momentum: how the Circular Action Alliance is shaping packaging waste management

July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation gains momentum: how the Circular Action Alliance is shaping packaging waste management

July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation gains momentum: how the Circular Action Alliance is shaping packaging waste management

July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation gains momentum: how the Circular Action Alliance is shaping packaging waste management

July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation gains momentum: how the Circular Action Alliance is shaping packaging waste management

July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

1 Information provided by NAPCOR from the studies Cradle-to-resin life cycle analysis of polyethylene terephthalate resin (March 2020) and Life cycle impacts for post-consumer recycled resins: PET, HDPE, and PP (December 2018). All data sources may be found on this link.
July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation gains momentum: how the Circular Action Alliance is shaping packaging waste management

July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation gains momentum: how the Circular Action Alliance is shaping packaging waste management

July 2024

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) legislation is rapidly changing the landscape of waste management in the United States. These laws place the financial and operational responsibility for the end-of-life management of products on the producers themselves. This incentivises producers to design more sustainable packaging and invest in recycling infrastructure.

At the forefront of this change is the Circular Action Alliance (CAA), a non-profit Producer Responsibility Organization (PRO) established in response to the growing number of EPR laws for packaging.

EPR explained

Traditionally, the burden of waste management has fallen on municipalities and consumers. EPR legislation shifts this responsibility to producers, who are charged fees based on the type and quantity of packaging they introduce into the market. These fees are then used to fund recycling programs, improve collection infrastructure, and promote innovation in sustainable packaging design.

The role of Producer Responsibility Organizations (PROs)

EPR laws are complex, requiring producers to navigate reporting requirements, fee structures, and compliance standards. This is where PROs like the CAA come in.

The CAA acts as a single point of contact for producers complying with EPR regulations in multiple states, and they offer a range of services:

  • Registration: The CAA helps producers determine if they are subject to EPR laws and facilitates the registration process.
  • Reporting: They assist producers in collecting and reporting data on the packaging they produce, which is crucial for calculating fees and program evaluation.
  • Compliance: The CAA provides guidance and resources to help producers comply with the specific requirements of each state's EPR program.
  • Advocacy: They advocate for effective and consistent EPR policies across the country.

The CAA in action

The CAA is currently the designated PRO for paper and packaging EPR programs in California, Colorado, and Maryland. They are also active in the states of Oregon and Maine, where they actively working with producers in these states to ensure compliance with upcoming deadlines and program rollouts.

The future of EPR

With more states considering EPR legislation, the CAA is well-positioned to play a leading role in shaping the future of packaging waste management in the US. Their efforts will be crucial in ensuring a more circular economy where packaging is designed for reuse and recycling, reducing environmental impact and promoting resource conservation. It is now on the producers to ensure that sustainable packaging is at the forefront of the operations.