June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

Insider's Opinion Interview – Mary Czarnopys

June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

1 Information provided by NAPCOR from the studies Cradle-to-resin life cycle analysis of polyethylene terephthalate resin (March 2020) and Life cycle impacts for post-consumer recycled resins: PET, HDPE, and PP (December 2018). All data sources may be found on this link.

Insider's Opinion Interview – Mary Czarnopys

June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

1 To learn more about Instituto de Embalagens, visit their website.
June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

Insider's Opinion Interview – Mary Czarnopys

June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

Insider's Opinion Interview – Mary Czarnopys

June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

Insider's Opinion Interview – Mary Czarnopys

June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

Insider's Opinion Interview – Mary Czarnopys

June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

Insider's Opinion Interview – Mary Czarnopys

June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

Insider's Opinion Interview – Mary Czarnopys

June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

1 Information provided by NAPCOR from the studies Cradle-to-resin life cycle analysis of polyethylene terephthalate resin (March 2020) and Life cycle impacts for post-consumer recycled resins: PET, HDPE, and PP (December 2018). All data sources may be found on this link.
June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

Insider's Opinion Interview – Mary Czarnopys

June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.

Insider's Opinion Interview – Mary Czarnopys

June 2024

As a new member of the Evertis team, what impact do you want to have on the company?

As a long-term flexible packaging industry associate, I recognise how cavalier my generation was about the importance of saving resources for future generations.  We were extremely wasteful.  As such, nowadays it’s difficult to tell people you’re involved in the “plastics” industry because they assume you’re part of the packaging problem that is contributing to ocean pollution and harming the animals that live near or in the ocean. My strongest impact on the company can be helping to save resources for future generations!

From a sustainability perspective, how would you like to see Evertis evolve?

An ideal would be to have Evertis lead the way for 100% recyclable products, as they’re much further ahead than most.  It would be great to design innovative films and products that can be thrown into the waste stream and fully recovered.

Can you briefly explain the emerging EPR (Extended Producer Responsibility) legislations and the potential impacts on companies?

The US has been behind the EU regarding EPR and sustainable packaging legislations and is now in “catch-up mode.”  As such, there are 5 US states that have enacted EPR legislation and are progressing forward:  California, Colorado, Maine, Maryland and Oregon are actively leading the way.  At a recent sustainable packaging technical committee, Sarah Washburn from the Circular Action Alliance (CAA) presented the various updates about EPR legislations in these states.

In addition, at the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) summer conference, the president of the organisation discussed how things are finally changing in the US and more significant efforts have been made in the last couple of years than in previous decades.  In fact, one resin supplier at the conference presented a video that shared their goal of never producing virgin resins, instead focusing on re-using resources to ensure that precious resources are no longer wasted at levels they are presently.  This is one of the most hopeful times to be working in the plastics industry.

You attended the IDDBA 2024 tradeshow in Houston, TX a few weeks ago, and met with various leaders in the food industry. How do you think Evertis can be of benefit to these companies?

What was obvious to me was that our customers have been hearing about “sustainable packaging” from brand owners and have some inklings as to what is needed; however, in the past everyone wanted to hear about sustainable packaging, but nobody wanted to pay the additional associated costs..  Now, with upcoming EPR fees, they’ll be paying costs for using films that cannot be recycled.  Since Evertis has been providing sustainable films for many years and is actively participating in committees that will help drive recycling of the sustainable films we produce, I think the biggest benefit is that we can present data to our customers and not just “greenwash” them.  We can help our customers understand and lead the market with solutions we’ve produced for years.  We have a significant advantage and can help our customers drive real changes.

What is one thing you would like people to know about our industry?

Many companies that offer “sustainable” packaging are not actually producing truly sustainable packaging.  Our industry is behind and needs to get caught up by doing, not just talking.  As stated prior, we talked too much in the past but didn’t have clear strategies that ensured preservation of resources for future generations.  We can do better, and I feel our industry is finally realising that fact.